SAT changes finalized for next year

After a decade of consideration, the SATs will finally be altered in March 2005, affecting those graduating in 2006 and thereafter.
Since the early 1990s, the widely used test has been under review in order to make it a better predictor of student success in college. After field tests in the spring of 2003, the new test is finally ready for widespread use.

“The new test is designed to be more in line with classroom teaching practices, and to give a better sense of how students will do in college,” counselor Lea Bonnuchi said.

The most dramatic changes are the elimination of analogies from the verbal section, which is changing its name to the critical reading section, and the addition of a writing section that will include multiple choice questions as well as an essay prompt. I do like the fact that they’re including an essay. Its beneficial to those not as skilled at math or multiple choice,” junior Erinn Unger said. However, some people feel differently about the changes.

“I don’t like the essay part. I mean, the test is supposedly stressful enough, and now they’re adding another huge part,”
sophomore Ryder Darcy said.

The new test is designed to be more in line with classroom teaching practices, and to give a better sense of how students will do in college”

— Lea Bonnuchi

In the math section, quantitative comparison sections are being eliminated because students are not often taught in this manner. Instead, the test will have more questions relating to information typically learned in Advanced Algebra.

The members of the Math Committee are encouraging the use of scientific or graphing calculators exclusively on the new test, instead of all kinds. Each section will continue to be scored in the 200-800 manner. The writing section will contain two sub-scores of 20-80 for the multiple choice and 2-12 for the essay.

With three sections the total SAT score will increase to 2400 as opposed to the current 1600.
“I feel bad from those who have to take the new SAT, all the books and courses are built around the old test, junior Samantha Sias said.
For more information students can speak with their counselor or go to www.collegeboard.com.